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Anglia DNA is excited to announce that we are supporting a local Norfolk charity – The Benjamin Foundation

Anglia DNA is excited to announce that we are supporting a local Norfolk charity – The Benjamin Foundation. Each year The Benjamin Foundation helps around 2,000 people in Norfolk and Suffolk by providing them with hope, opportunity, stability and independence. Chris Elliot, fundraising manager at the Benjamin Foundation, recognised how Anglia DNA could partner with this trusted charity to help spread the word about the organisation.

Ben Lewis and Kirsty Middlemiss from Anglia DNA met up with Chris and had a tour of their premises and learnt firsthand about how children, young people and families benefit from the vital work undertaken by the foundation. Ben and Kirstie are looking forward to speaking with their Anglia DNA colleagues and put together an action plan for upcoming events in 2018.

If you would like to know more and see how you may be able to help the Benjamin Foundation, please click on the link here.

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Parents sue top fertility doctor ‘who used his OWN sperm to impregnate women’

A fertility doctor has been accused of using his OWN sperm to impregnate patients. Dr Norman Barwin, now retired, is facing a class action lawsuit in Ottawa, Canada.

Rebecca Dixon, 26, first had suspicions about her parentage when she was diagnosed with Celiac disease, a hereditary condition neither her mother or father suffered. She also has brown eyes when both of her parents have blue eyes. Rebecca recently took a DNA test which confirmed her worst fears, her father was not related to her.

Dr. Norman Barwin

Rebecca Dixon

The Dixon family then found out that their doctor, Norman Barwin, had been suspended from the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons after he admitted to inseminating four patients with the wrong sperm in 2013.

Closer inspection of pictures also raised their suspicions Dr Barwin may be the father; both are olive-skinned with dark hair.

Meanwhile another woman inseminated by Dr Barwin, 25-year-old Kathryn Palmer, had made similar startling discoveries. Her parents had believed they had been given an anonymous sperm donor but when Ms Palmer researched her family tree via a DNA website, she found she was related to a cousin who was also related to Dr Barwin.

Ms Palmer said Dr Darwin confirmed to her in an email that he was her biological father.

“He told me initially that he had no idea how it had happened. And then later he told me that he had been testing a sperm counter and this must’ve been some contamination,” she said.

Lawyers now claim DNA tests prove Palmer and Dixon are half-sisters who share the same biological father.

Dr Barwin has not responded to any of the allegations in the lawsuit.

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Usain Bolt loses one Olympic gold medal after team-mate fails drug test

USAIN Bolt no longer has the title of triple-triple Olympic champion after his Jamaican sprint relay team-mate Nesta Carter was disqualified from the 2008 Beijing Games for failing a drugs test.

The 31-year-old Carter ran the first leg in the 4×100 metres relay in Beijing, helping Jamaica to a new world record of 37.10 seconds and Bolt to his third Olympic gold medal.

But the International Olympic Committee has now stripped the Jamaicans of that victory after a re-analysis of Carter’s anti-doping sample tested positive for the banned stimulant methylhexaneamine.

Bolt, who repeated the 100-200-relay triple in London and Rio, and his team-mates have known this day was coming since last summer, when rumours of Carter’s positive test first surfaced.

Bolt, Carter, Michael Frater, Asafa Powell and Dwight Thomas, who ran in the heats, will now have to return their gold medals, with Trinidad & Tobago, Japan and Brazil the new one-two-three.

Methylhexaneamine is an energy-boosting ingredient in many dietary supplements and several Jamaican athletes have failed tests for it before, including five sprinters in 2009.

Given its prevalence, though, sanctions tend to be on the lenient side, with bans of three to six months common. The loss of an Olympic gold is an unusually strict punishment.

While there may be some sympathy for Carter and company, news that Tatyana Lebedeva has also been caught in the IOC’s 2008 and 2012 re-testing programme will not attract much pity.

The winner of 17 global medals during a glittering career, Lebedeva claimed silver medals in the long jump and triple jump in Beijing but now loses those thanks to a positive test for the steroid turinabol.

Now 40, the Russian will keep the long jump gold she won in Athens in 2004 and triple jump silver she won in Sydney four years earlier. She is also a three-time outdoor and indoor world champion.

She skipped most of the 2010 and 2011 seasons to have her second daughter but returned to competition for the London Olympics in 2012, when she came 10th in the triple jump.

Nigeria’s Blessing Okagbare should inherit her long jump silver from Beijing, with Jamaican Chelsea Hammond stepping up to bronze.

With the original bronze-medal winner Hrysopiyi Devetzi of Greece already banned from triple jump, Lebedeva’s silver should go to Olga Rypakova of Kazakhstan, and Cuba’s Yargelis Savigne will now get bronze.

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The ‘app store for genetics’ just landed another major partner

Helix, a company that wants to act like an “app store” of your genetic code, just landed another partner that will build one of the first apps on the platform.

The startup launched August 2015 with $100 million in funding from Illumina and other partners.

Every time you do a DNA test, parts of your same genes are just getting sequenced again and again. Helix wants to cut out that physical step.

Instead of sending your spit 10 different places for 10 different tests, you could just let companies access your genetic code. That way, companies could just develop the apps that analyze your DNA to give you the insights you’re looking for (where does your family come from, or do you have a mutation that predisposes you to a certain cancer) without the cost of developing a lab.

When Helix got started last year, the team announced that partners including Mayo Clinic, Duke University, Lab Corp, and GoodStart Genetics would be building out tests for the Helix platform.

Now, Invitae, a company that’s been in the genetic testing space for the last six years, wants to get in on the platform too. It’s developing health tests that will look at common genetic risk factors, something its CEO says could be useful for generally healthy individuals. (Its standard tests, which Invitae runs on its own platform, are mainly targeted at people at high risk for certain heart conditions, genetic diseases, or cancers.)

“We’re taking all of this very sophisticated technology that we built for the mainstream, high-risk diagnostic market,” Invitae’s CEO Randy Scott told Business Insider. “But[using the Helix platform] … a healthy individual can get a low-cost scan where we can at least pick up the most common, actionable mutations for cancer and cardiovascular disease and provide that information to patients.”

The tests will still have to go through your physician, and will likely cost less than $200, Scott said.

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